The Best Diet And Exercise REVIEW from Coach Garey

Hey! We’re continuing to talk about “the best diet.” And, of course, that answer to that question, “What is the best diet?” is going to be uniquely tailored to who you are.

Yes, it’s true. 99% were the same. You’ve got that same DNA. We’ve got variants. Right? So, for example, human beings are 94% related to chimpanzees DNA-wise. So that 6% makes a pretty huge difference. You can’t really mistake a chimpanzee for a human being. We’re different species.

Human beings are 99.9% the same DNA-wise. But, when there is a variant in one snippet of DNA code, there are a million different variants for that one snippet. That makes us genuinely unique. No matter who you are, you are a unique character on this planet. And what the answer is to the best I have for you is something of a discovery method, where you have to do a little research, a little testing, find out what works, what doesn’t work.

So one of the diets I’ve just recently been introduced to … it’s not like I haven’t done this before. I’ve gone through a number of different iterations. But my understanding is a little bit clearer today because I’ve had some experience working with some really great coaches and some naturopathic doctors and MDs, functional medicine doctors.

What I’ve gathered, what I’ve garnered together is for me, in my particular circumstance where I’m on right now and what I’m trying, is low-carb high-fat diet. So what that means, basically, in essence, is that I’ve had to really strictly limit the carbohydrates, because apparently my body will take those carbohydrates, instantly turn them into fat. Now, it could be, I’m not using the carbs properly, because I’m sitting down a lot. I’m at the desk. Right? I’m not moving enough. So your doctor will tell you this. It’s your diet with your lifestyle. It’s diet and exercise. That stipulation is always attached to any recommendations about changes that you’re going to make. It’s diet and lifestyle, exercise to be very specific.

And for a lot of people, moderate exercise is just great. There’s been plenty of studies on this. If you’re willing to get out of your house and go for a walk, take your dog for a walk every day, twice a day, three times a day, you’re going to live longer than the cat owner down the street that never takes the cat outside, and doesn’t get out except maybe to check their mail. So that’s, that’s a distinguishing remark that I want to make about the level of exercise that you may be engaging in.

Now, for a person like me … I’m 67 years old. I’ve been around the world, traveled to 35 different countries. I’m pretty much settled back in the States now, but I’ve been at a desk for 15 years doing pretty much the same thing every day. And there have been times where I exercised a lot, where I got into a habit of going to the gym and swimming at least five days a week. I started with 10 laps, got up to 20 laps, 25 laps. And then it got cold. And then the pandemic, and then the rules changed about the gym, and who can use the pool, at what time.

And then they closed for cleaning and it became a pretty big hassle, so I gave up on it.

I bought a stationary bike for the house. Did some exercise in front of the TV, which worked for a little while? But, hey, this one little key piece of advice is that when you make a decision to change something in your lifestyle, you got to really make that decision and add some commitment to it, and then ingrain yourself with some discipline that this is going to be the new you.

Recently, I was advised by a naturopathic doctor that I really need to bump up the strenuous exercise. What that means is there’s a program called H-I-I-T HIIT Training. So it’s a high-intensity, intermittent training, H-I-I-T. and that’s really actually pretty easy to do. And it gets your heart rate up. I don’t know the exact statistic if it’s twice or three times or five times or 10 times better than just plain aerobics, but being able to get your heart rate up to a certain level, 80% of max, and then resting and dropping it down. Back up, down, back up, down.

There’s a doctor by the name of Dr. Mercola. He’s pretty famous on the internet. He has got a pretty big website, full of supplements and advice and interviews. And he came up with a strategy called Peak 8, where you get your heart level up eight times for at least 30 seconds, then rest for 45 seconds. Up for 30 seconds, rest for a minute or two minutes. You can get that Peak 8 done well in under 20 minutes and be satisfied that you’ve done the cardiovascular exercise that your heart really needs in order to keep the blood moving.

And here’s the interesting thing. Cholesterol is fat in the blood. Triglycerides, that’s fat in the blood. If you want to burn that fat … We’re all concerned about the subcutaneous belly fat. We’re also, or we should be, concerned about the visceral fat that encases our organs if we’re really overweight. And then there’s fat in the blood that actually can be burnt off through high-intensity intermittent interval training.

Take that to the bank. And remember, we do have supplements on our website. We have ac combination of products that are specifically tailored for certain conditions that may be of help to you. I’d like you to check us out.